Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell - Part 1: The role of PowerShell in IT-aware Services and Applications Running Social Media campaigns with PowerShell Thinking about Cloud Strategy Taking the Social Media Interconnection Map to the Next Level “Less is more” … Have we achieved it on this new release of the Framework? “Cloud Computing: Vision or Reality” Notes on Windows Advanced Troubleshooting By defining Innovation, you draw your future … (Part 1 of 3) Say hello to the Social Media Scripting Framework! The real cost of your Personal Cloud

Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell — Part 2: “The Dark Side”

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SMSF Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell Part 2 The Dark Side Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell   Part 2: The Dark Side

What we have seen on our pre­vi­ous post may seem inter­est­ing and pow­er­ful. Essentially, what we are doing is open­ing the door to cre­at­ing local datasets with per­son­ally iden­ti­fi­able infor­ma­tion com­ing from our Social Networks. That’s a pretty big deal. Therefore, there are a cou­ple of things that we need to under­stand before going forward.

Privacy, Law and Ethics

Usually, on Digital Media, when­ever you can access some infor­ma­tion is because you have rights and per­mis­sions to do so. However, I would like you to con­sider the dif­fer­ence between “can” and “should”. Now, you have the chance to “down­load” datasets to your PC. That’s a sub­stan­tial dif­fer­ence from when data lives fully on the server. Now you are host­ing an instance of that data and there­fore you are legally bound by law to those juris­dic­tions applic­a­ble to you.

Bare in mind that reg­u­la­tory bod­ies may require that you apply high lev­els of pro­tec­tion and secu­rity to datasets con­tain­ing per­son­ally iden­ti­fi­able infor­ma­tion about reli­gion, race, sex ori­en­ta­tion, or any sort of affil­i­a­tion. This could very well be the case of your dataset. However, even if this is not the case, you can’t be sure whether the ones you are going to deal with tomor­row will put you in such a sit­u­a­tion.

Continue read­ing …

Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell — Part 1: “The How To”

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SMSF Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell Part 1 The How To Spotting influencers and VIPs in LinkedIn with PowerShell   Part 1: The How To

Liking, com­ment­ing, tag­ging, book­mark­ing or defin­ing some­thing as favorite are all com­mon on-line activ­i­ties these days. However, most of us don’t real­ize the depth of infor­ma­tion we leave behind each time we per­form them and what we can actu­ally do with that information.

This is per­fectly under­stand­able in a world that hides all those details behind APIs that reg­u­lar peo­ple can’t use. Fortunately, this is no longer the case any­more. Today I would like to show you how to lever­age the Social Media Scripting Framework to extract mean­ing­ful infor­ma­tion from those that con­nect with you or your brand in LinkedIn.

Let’s start by get­ting data from our LinkedIn Timelines …

Now, let’s have a look at what we’ve got in return:

As you can see, we have posts from one LinkedIn Group and from a LinkedIn Company Page. You many also have noticed that we requested 100 posts and we were given just 83 … Sorry guys, wel­come to the world of the LinkedIn API … In future posts I will show you how to get this around ;-).

Let’s have a look to the inter­ac­tions that have taken place on these posts:

Simple, isn’t it? Notice that there are a num­ber of peo­ple that con­sis­tently inter­act with that brand.

Continue read­ing …

“Less is more” … Have we achieved it on this new release of the Framework?

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SMSF Less is more Less is more ... Have we achieved it on this new release of the Framework?

Back in 2013, I shipped the Social Media Scripting Framework for the first time. I was excited about it, but, at the same time, I real­ized that there were some things that, clearly, were too com­pli­cated. There is still a lot of work to do to make it even more sim­ple and more capa­ble. This is, def­i­nitely, not over. Anyway, I would like to spend some time show­ing you how the new updates have sim­pli­fied the way you inter­act with the frame­work and how to get the most of it.

Working with Excel

The Excel mod­ule has changed a great deal in many ways. First, you no longer have to have a local copy of Excel on your local com­puter in order to work with data stored on Excel files. Of course, you can have it, but the Social Media Scripting Framework doesn’t rely on it any more.

Let’s see what your expe­ri­ence was and how it is today:

On pre­vi­ous versions …

And, with the new version …

Despite being more sim­ple, no pre­vi­ous func­tion­al­ity has been lost. In fact, the new imple­men­ta­tion includes the pos­si­bil­ity to define the point where your dataset begins.

The Information and Process Cycle …

On pre­vi­ous ver­sions of the frame­work it was still nec­es­sary to trans­form and/or attach exter­nal data to that retrieved from the dif­fer­ent APIs.

Continue read­ing …

Written by Carlos Veira Lorenzo

March 3rd, 2014 at 9:31 pm

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